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Week Commencing 20th April 2020

Place Value

This week we are going to be focusing on place value and below are the key words we use in school.

 

Tens                      Ones                     Hundreds                            Partition             

 

 

Odd                       Even

 

 

Less than                            Greater than                      Equal

Monday – Place Value Games

Some of the most effective learning is through play so today we are going to play some place value games:

 

Game 1 - Odd or Even

Write a number on your child’s whiteboard and get them to say whether the number is odd or even.

Remember to ask your child how they know. Numbers with any of these digits in the ones column 1,3,5,7 and 9 are odd and numbers with these digits 2, 4, 6, 8, 0 in the ones column are even.

 

Game 2 – Place Value Challenge

Start slowly and begin to add numbers once your child fully understands the game. Begin by writing 2 digits on a whiteboard e.g. 3 and 6. Then ask your child to write the biggest number they can (63). You can make this more complicated by using 3 digits, or even by asking questions like “Can you write a number between 24 and 53? (36).

Remember have fun with this game turn it into a challenge. Year 2 children are expected to be fluent within 100 but many will be able to do this with 3 digit numbers.

 

Online games

Place Value Basketball - https://www.topmarks.co.uk/learning-to-count/place-value-basketball

Shark Numbers - http://www.ictgames.com/sharkNumbers/mobile/index.html

Tuesday – Partition a number (practically)

It is really important that your child understands what a number is made up of. Initially 23 is seen as  2 tens and 3 ones, however in we move onto partitioning flexibly so 23 could be 15 and 8.

 

Try and partition the numbers below:

15                          45                          87

 

Use resources to help your child. You could use Lego, pencil crayons, or anything else you may have in the house. Let’s look at 15. Get your child to get 15 pieces of lego, or whatever you are using. Ask your child to partition into 2 groups, for example 6 and 9. “Can you partition the number in a different way?”

Wednesday – Partitioning a number 

Today we are going to be building on what we learnt yesterday. We would like you to create a mindmap with a number in the middle and then show us how many ways you can partition the number.

 

Thursday – Place Value Problem Solving

Today is going to involve lots of whiteboard work using the part part whole model. The premise of the part part whole is that the two parts add up to make the whole (example below). Obviously the missing number is 9. Practise completing examples of these with your child on their whiteboard, or a piece of paper.

 

 

 

 

 

Please don’t just stick to these examples, be creative.       

More examples and guidance on these can be found on The White Rose Hub (link below).

https://wrm-13b48.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/SoLs/Primary/Autumn2019-20/Year-2-Autumn-Block-1-Number-Place-Value.pdf

Friday – Place Value Reasoning Day

Begin today by representing numbers in lots of different ways. An example of this might be representing numbers using forks and spoons, a fork might be worth 10 and a spoon might be worth 1. Therefore, 12 would mean you need 1 fork and 2 spoons. Another example might be a piece of lego is worth 5 and a lego man is worth 1. Therefore, 12 would now be 2 pieces of lego and 2 lego men. Be creative with this and we would love to see your pictures on our twitter page.

 

Below are some example of reasoning problems involving place value. We don’t expect you to print these out but if you would like to follow the link below. https://wrm-13b48.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/SoLs/Primary/Autumn2019-20/Year-2-Autumn-Block-1-Number-Place-Value.pdf

The idea is that you spend time talking to your child about the problem and possible ways in which the problem can be solved. Time spent verbalising understanding is one of the most effective ways to develop a child’s understanding.

 

 

 

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